donderdag 27 februari 2014

E-Humanities or Digital Humanities: a matter of content, taste or pragmatism?

Whenever there is a new field within academia there also is the necessary discussion on how we should call this. A name can have major consequences for the image of a field, for 'who is in' (or thinks to be in), for grant applications and for the future of the field. This is not any different for Digital Humanities or e(-)Humanities. Both terms refer to more or less the following: 'a field of study, research, teaching, and invention concerned with the intersection of computing and the disciplines of the humanities. It is methodological by nature and interdisciplinary in scope. It involves investigation, analysis, syntehsis and presentation of information in electronic form. It studies how these media affect the disciplines in which they are used, and what these disciplines have to contribute to our knowledge of computing.'[1] In other words, it is a discipline which occupies itself with both tools and methodology on the intersection of humanities and computer science. One of the recurring questions is how humanities scholars can do their job better with the help of the computer scientist and, on the other hand, how computer scientists can build better tools with the input of humanities scholars. The question here however is: should we speak of e-Humanities or Digital Humanities?

Personally I find labeling not very interesting. It does not matter if you call emperor Charles V a Burgundian (according to himself) or a Habsburg (according to historiography), he still is the same person. I will not read his correspondence any better or differently when choosing for one or the other. In such cases I tend to pragmatically join the opinion of the majority and focus on matters that really do matter. As said however, name-giving can have major consequences, which at times forces a person to think carefully if there really are no benefits or disadavantages to using one term or the other. My direct motive to think of the Digital Humanities or e-Humanities question was a discrepancy in the name-giving of the University of Amsterdam/VU University Amsterdam minor 'Digital Humanities' and the VU University history specialization 'e-Humanities'. Where do both terms come from and is there a good reason to prefer one term or the other?

Let us first take a look at what both terms strictly speaking mean. 'Digital' is an abbreviation for 'technology, media and information' [2]. This term therefore describes quite well which fields Digital Humanities covers. 'Digital' however, does not imply that there also is a newer or different form of academic research. This element does come back in the term e-Humanities. The 'e' then stands for 'enhanced' or 'enabled.'.[3] 
It is unfortunate however that 'e' also is used as an abbreviation for the banal 'electronic' (e-mail, e-learning), which in its turn is not nearly as rich in meaning as digital. Purely semantically speaking therefore there do not seem to be any conclusive arguments for one or the other. 

Perhaps then it is useful to look at the birth of both terms, because undoubtedly many before us have thought of this matter thoroughly.The term e-Humanities finds its direct predecessor in the term
e-Science. An article by Gregory Norton tells us where the term originated from: "In 1999, Professor John Taylor, the then Director General of the United Kingdom's Office of Science and Technology, invented the term to describe the development of computationally intensive science that is carried out in highly distributed network environments, or science that uses immense data sets that require grid computing."[4] The term therefore was mostly created to separate large scale research with 'big data', data which cannot be analysed with traditional methods, and the complexities that it entails from more classical research with smaller datasets. There also were, however, some skeptics, who considered the term as a fashion label in order to get research financed. The e-label stuck in the name-giving of many research institutes. There is the Dutch eScience center,  for example, which also hosts a limited number of  e-Humanities projects. It is quite logical then, to speak of e-Humanities as a branch of e-Science.

There is a rather convincing consensus on the origins of the term Digital Humanities and it is always linked to the much older term 'Humanities Computing'. At the end of last century or the beginning of this century the term 'Humanities Computing' was considered to be too much focused on the computational aspect of what was going to be called Digital Humanities. Computational, yes, but humanities should remain the main objective. When in 2001 Ray Siemens and John Unsworth wanted to write a book on  'Humanities Computing', the publisher thought it was a better idea, for marketing reasons, to give the book the title 'Digitized Humanities'. John Unsworth then proposed the term  'Digital Humanities', to avoid people thinking that it was only about simple digitizing [5]. At that time 'Digital Humanities' already was in use at the university of Virginia where Unsworth was teaching. [6] This term was adopted by the Digital Humanities Initiative (2006), the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations (2005) and the Digital Humanities Quarterly (2007). One of the people behind the Digital Humanities Inititiative gave as primary reasons for this choice that a) It has a broader meaning than humanities computing, b) a Google search showed that Digital Humanities was winning from ehumanities and Humanities Computing. [7] The recent standard works Understanding Digital Humanities and Debates in the Digital Humanities do not even hint at any competition with the term e-Humanities.

A follow-up question to all this is what the situation is outside the English speaking territories. As said before, the battle in the Netherlands between the two terms is not over yet. A striking example was last year's workshop  'Digital humanities: Critical views and experiences', organized by the e-Humanities Group, of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. Increasingly however, one seems to choose for Digital Humanities. The Amsterdam minor is going to be called this way, as well as the Digital Humanities minor in Utrecht. The recently brought to life DHBenelux conference also uses Digital Humanities. When we look at the situation in Germany then the terminology does not point in one direction either. We do find articles with e-humanities in its title, but the term Digital Humanities is leading on the German Wikipedia. The French speak of 'humanités numériques' as a literal translation from Digital Humanities, even though they have to cope with the competing term 'humanités digitales'.

The question remains if we become much wiser because of all of this. I am afraid that the answer is negative. The battle of terms, for as far as there is any, cannot or can hardly be won with sound arguments. There are not really any grand ideas behind the terms e-Science and Digital Humanities. The term e-Humanities fits better in the tradition of other e-Science disciplines and has a deeper meaning, which seems to be exactly what Mark Sample means with his comment on a HASTAC forum: "The digital humanities should not be about the digital at all. It’s all about innovation and disruption.The digital humanities is really an insurgent humanities." [8] It also is clear, on the other hand, that the term 'Digital Humanites' went viral in the English speaking territories and therefore (increasingly) quantitatively speaking is the winner. For an internationally oriented educational program therefore, it should be the the preferred term.

[1]M. Kirschenbaum, 'What is Digital Humanities? And What's it Doing in English Departments?' in: M. K. Gold ed., Debates in the Digital Humanities (Minneapolis en Londen, 2012) 3-11, at 4. This is a quotation from the entry on Digital Humanities on Wikipedia. Since that time this entry has changed again however, imho not for the good..
[2] A. Liu,  ‘The state of the digital humanities. A report and a critique’, Arts and Humanities in Higher Education II (1-2) 8-41, at 11.
[3] The German Wikipedia (retrieved 20 February 2014) puts this quite clearly:
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/E-Science en http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Humanities
[4] G. Norton, 'The "e" Prefix: e-Science, e-Art & the New Creativity', Digital Humanities Quarterly 2009: 3.4 , 5.
[5] M. Kirschenbaum, 'What is Digital Humanities? And What's it Doing in English Departments?' in: M. K. Gold ed., Debates in the Digital Humanities (Minneapolis and Londen, 2012) 3-11, at 5.
[6] M. Kirschenbaum, 'Digital Humanities As/Is a Tactical Term'  in: M. K. Gold ed., Debates in the Digital Humanities (Minneapolis en Londen, 2012) 415-428, at 419-420; N. K Hayles, 'How we think: transforming power and digital technologies' in D. Berry ed., Understanding Digital Humanities(Basingstoke 2012) 42-66, at 43.
[7] M. Kirschenbaum, 'What is Digital Humanities? And What's it Doing in English Departments?' in: M. K. Gold ed., Debates in the Digital Humanities (Minneapolis en Londen, 2012) 3-11, at 6.
[8] Cited by P. Svensson, ‘Envisioning the Digital Humanities’, Digital Humanities Quarterly 6 (2012) vol.1, 40.

dinsdag 25 februari 2014

E-Humanities of Digital Humanities: een kwestie van inhoud, smaak of pragmatisme?

Als er een nieuwe stroming binnen de wetenschappen ontstaat dan is er ook altijd de nodige discussie over hoe we dit fenomeen moeten noemen. Het een en ander kan grote gevolgen hebben voor het imago, voor wie denkt 'er bij te horen', voor subsidieaanvragen en voor de toekomstige invulling van de stroming. Dat is niet anders bij Digital Humanities of e(-)Humanities. Onder beide termen wordt min of meer het volgende geschaard: 'a field of study, research, teaching, and invention concerned with the intersection of computing and the disciplines of the humanities. It is methodological by nature and interdisciplinary in scope. It involves investigation, analysis, syntehsis and presentation of information in electronic form. It studies how these media affect the disciplines in which they are used, and what these disciplines have to contribute to our knowledge of computing.'[1] Het gaat dus met andere woorden om een discipline die zich bezighoudt met zowel tools als methode op het snijvlak van de geesteswetenschappen en computer science. Een van de terugkerende vragen is hoe geesteswetenschappers hun werk beter kunnen doen met behulp van de computer scientist en, aan de andere kant, hoe computer scientists betere tools kunnen maken met behulp van de input van geesteswetenschappers. De vraag hier is nu echter: moeten we het hebben over e-Humanities of Digital Humanities?

Persoonlijk vind ik het plakken van labels niet zo interessant. Keizer Karel V is nog steeds dezelfde persoon, of je hem nu een Bourgondiër (volgens zichzelf) of een Habsburger (volgens de historiografie) noemt. Ik ga zijn correspondentie niet beter of anders lezen als ik voor het een of het ander een voorkeur uitspreek. Pragmatisch gezien sluit ik mij in dit soort gevallen daarom graag aan bij de mening van de meerderheid, om mij te richten op zaken die er wel echt toe doen. Zoals gezegd kan naamgeving echter grote consequenties hebben, waardoor men soms toch gedwongen wordt een keer goed stil te staan bij het waarom van het gebruik van een bepaalde term en of er werkelijk niet een meerwaarde is verbonden aan het een of het ander. Directe aanleiding voor het denken over de kwestie Digital Humanities of e-Humanities was een discrepantie in de naamgeving van de UvA/VU minor 'Digital Humanities' en het VU geschiedenis keuzepakket.'e-Humanities'. Waar komen die twee verschillende termen vandaan en is er nu met goede reden een voorkeur te geven voor een van beide?

Laten we eerst kijken naar wat de termen nu strikt genomen betekenen. Digitaal is een afkorting voor 'technology, media and information' [2]. Met deze term wordt dus heel aardig omvat welke gebieden Digital Humanities bestrijkt. In 'digital' zit echter niet besloten dat het ook gaat om een andere, of nieuwere, vorm van wetenschap bedrijven. Dat element komt wel terug in e-Humanities. De 'e' staat dan voor 'enhanced' of 'enabled' [3]. Het is echter onfortuinlijk dat 'e' ook gebruikt wordt als afkorting van het banale 'electronic' (e-mail, e-learning), wat juist weer een stuk minder rijk is in betekenis dan digital. Puur taalkundig gezien lijken er derhalve geen doorslaggevende argumenten te geven.

Misschien is het aardig om dan eens te kijken naar de ontstaansgeschiedenis van beide termen, want ongetwijfeld hebben velen voor ons hier diep over nagedacht. De term e-Humanities vindt haar directe voorloper in de term e-Science. Een artikel van Gregory Norton biedt uitkomst over waar deze term vandaan komt: "In 1999, Professor John Taylor, the then Director General of the United Kingdom's Office of Science and Technology, invented the term to describe the development of computationally intensive science that is carried out in highly distributed network environments, or science that uses immense data sets that require grid computing."[4] De term was vooral bedacht om grootschalig onderzoek met 'big data', data die niet te analyseren is met traditionele methoden, en de complexiteiten die daar bij komen kijken te onderscheiden van meer klassiek onderzoek met kleinere datasets. Er waren echter ook de nodige sceptici over de term, die het vooral beschouwden als een modewoord om onderzoek gefinancierd te krijgen. Het e-label is blijven plakken in de naamgeving van vele onderzoeksinstituten, niet in de laatste plaats bij het Nederlandse eScience center. Naast vele bètaprojecten financiert het eScience centerook een beperkt aantal e-Humanities projecten. Het is tamelijk logisch, vervolgens, om arm in arm met e-Science de term e-Humanities te gebruiken.

Over de oorsprong van de term Digital Humanities is in de literatuur een tamelijke grote consensus en wordt altijd beschreven in samenhang met de nog veel oudere term Humanities Computing. De laatste term werd aan het eind van vorige eeuw of begin van deze eeuw beschouwd als teveel gericht op het computationele deel, aangezien het uiteindelijk nog steeds om humanities onderzoek gaat. Toen in 2001 Ray Siemens en John Unsworth een boek over 'Humanities Computing' wilden schrijven, vond de uitgever om marketingredenen de titel 'Digitized Humanities' beter. Vervolgens stelde John Unsworth de term 'Digital Humanities' voor, om te voorkomen dat de indruk werd gewekt dat het alleen zou gaan om simpele digitalisering. [5] 'Digital Humanities' werd toen al gebruikt aan de universiteit van Virginia, waar Unsworth doceerde. [6] Deze term sloeg aan. Zowel het Digital Humanities Initiative (2006), de Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations (2005) als de Digital Humanities Quarterly (2007) namen de term over. Een van de mensen achter het Digital Humanities Inititative geeft als voornaamste redenen dat het a) Een bredere betekenis heeft dan humanities computing, b) een Google search uitwees dat Digital Humanities het won van ehumanities en Humanities Computing [7]. Ook de recente standaardwerken Understanding Digital Humanities en Debates in the Digital Humanities doen zelfs niet vermoeden dat er werkelijk nog sprake is van enige concurrentie met de term e-Humanities.

Een volgende vraag die men zich kan stellen is hoe het staat met het gebruik van de termen buiten het Angelsaksische taalgebied.  Zoals gezegd is de strijd in Nederland nog niet gestreden. Sprekend hierbij is bijvoorbeeld de workshop 'Digital humanities: Critical views and experiences', die werd georganiseerd door de e-Humanities Group, van de KNAW. In toenemende mate lijkt men in Nederland echter te kiezen voor Digital Humanities. De UvA/VU minor gaat zo heten, evenals de Digital Humanities minor in Utrecht. Ook de recent in het leven geroepen DHBenelux conferentie hanteert Digital Humanities. Als we kijken bij onze oosterburen dan is op de Duitse Wikipedia de term Digital Humanities leidend, maar zien ook artikelen met e-humanities in de titel het licht. Bij de Fransen is het weer 'humanités numériques' als letterlijke vertaling van Digital Humanities, al hebben zij weer als concurrerende term 'humanités digitales'.

De vraag is nu of we hier veel wijzer van worden. Het antwoord moet vrees ik ontkennend zijn. De termenstrijd, voor zover daar sprake van mocht zijn, kan niet of nauwelijks op inhoudelijke of taalkundige argumenten gewonnen worden. Achter het ontstaan van de termen e-Science en Digital Humanities zitten minder grote gedachten dan gehoopt. De term e-Humanities past beter in de traditie van andere e-Science disciplines en heeft een diepere betekenis, die goed lijkt te pasen bij het commentaar van Mark Sample op het forum van HASTAC: "The digital humanities should not be about the digital at all. It’s all about innovation and disruption.The digital humanities is really an insurgent humanities." [8] Aan de andere kant is duidelijk dat de term Digital Humanities in de Angelsaksiche wereld 'viral' is gegaan en het daardoor kwantitatief gezien (in toenemende mate) van e-Humanities wint. Als een opleiding zich internationaal wilt profileren dan heeft die naam derhalve de voorkeur.  



[1]M. Kirschenbaum, 'What is Digital Humanities? And What's it Doing in English Departments?' in: M. K. Gold ed., Debates in the Digital Humanities (Minneapolis en Londen, 2012) 3-11, aldaar 4. Er wordt verwezen naar het lemma Digital Humanities op Wikipedia, dat sinds publicatie van het artikel echter weer is aangepast, naar mijn mening niet ten goede.
[2] A. Liu,  ‘The state of the digital humanities. A report and a critique’, Arts and Humanities in Higher Education II (1-2) 8-41, aldaar 11.
[3] De Duitse Wikipedia geeft hier in mijn ogen een goed overzicht weer:
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/E-Science en http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Humanities
[4] G. Norton, 'The "e" Prefix: e-Science, e-Art & the New Creativity', Digital Humanities Quarterly 2009: 3.4 , 5.
[5] M. Kirschenbaum, 'What is Digital Humanities? And What's it Doing in English Departments?' in: M. K. Gold ed., Debates in the Digital Humanities (Minneapolis en Londen, 2012) 3-11, aldaar 5.
[6] M. Kirschenbaum, 'Digital Humanities As/Is a Tactical Term'  in: M. K. Gold ed., Debates in the Digital Humanities (Minneapolis en Londen, 2012) 415-428, aldaar 419-420; N. K Hayles, 'How we think: transforming power and digital technologies' in D. Berry ed., Understanding Digital Humanities(Basingstoke 2012) 42-66, aldaar 43.
[7] M. Kirschenbaum, 'What is Digital Humanities? And What's it Doing in English Departments?' in: M. K. Gold ed., Debates in the Digital Humanities (Minneapolis en Londen, 2012) 3-11, aldaar 6.
[8] Geciteerd door P. Svensson, ‘Envisioning the Digital Humanities’, Digital Humanities Quarterly 6 (2012) vol.1, 40.

maandag 24 februari 2014

Mixed Teams in Every Aspect of the Mission: Collaboration in Digital Humanities

It does happen, fortunately not too often, that work situations make me think of parallels in movies and tv series. When I had to prepare a presentation on interdisciplinary collaboration in a Digital Humanities context for a shared meeting of two research institutes my thoughts went out to an epsiode of Star Trek: Deep Space 9. In this episode, with the telling title 'To the Death' the crew of the Starship Defiant is forced to work together with the Jem'Hadar against a  common enemy. This collaboration did not exactly have a flying start because of, let us say, different mentalities. The Jem'Hadar do not eat, do not sleep and go into battle to reclaim their lives rather than to simply survive. Understandably, in the beginning there was not much mutual respect during the battle drills. When captain Sisko irritably tells the Jem'Hadar leader that it does not help that his men continuously show contempt for the Defiant crew, the Jem'Hadar speaks wise words:

“The only way my troops can come to respect your crew is to fight alongside them. Mixed teams in every aspect of the mission.”

When this idea of mixed teams was put into practice, the Jem'Hadar showed even more wisdom when science officer Jadzia Dax questions one of them about his behavious:

“Am I really that interesting? You've been standing there staring at me for the last two hours.” 

The Jem'Hadar answered with: “You are part of my combat team. I must learn to understand your behaviour"

With this parellel  in mind the most important elements for interdisciplinary collboration in a Digital Humanities context can be tackled:
 
1. Unlikely collaboration becomes likely when there is a common goal
2. Mutual respect and understanding is necessary for a succesful collaboration
3. Collaboration means working with each other, not next to each other
4.  Yes, it is interesting to know what your team mate does and it is worth studying that (even though under normal circumstances it might be advisable not to do this by staring at each other for two hours).
5. It is important to understand each other, get to learn each others 'language' and customs. Even though biologically speaking humanities scholars and computer scientists are more related to each other than the crew of the Defiant to the Jem'Hadar, it still can seem that they come from different planets, have other customs and speak an other language.

These elements might seem to speak for themselves, but in practice quite some Digital Humanities projects encounter difficulties because the collaboration is failing. Are there really so many differences between the academic discplines then, except for the obvious statements that a computer scientist usually does not know much about historical source criticism and that a historian's mind tends to go blank when one speaks of RDF and ontologies? Is the academic approach to get as close as possible to the 'truth' not something which binds all academic disciplines? Possibly, but there still are enough differences which make interdisciplnary collaboration something to get used to.

First of all there is the case of the self centered humanities scholar. Historians and their humanities brothers and sisters usually publish alone, or with a maximum of two or three people. They even think they can 'claim' a certain topic and it is the nightmare of many that someone 'secretly' is working on the same topic [1]. People who have in some way contributed to a book or paper are mentioned in a footnote or in a preface. Naturally, this entails the risk that people who are not mentioned feel intensely insulted. The writing itself is a fundamental part of a publication. The synthesis based on the presented, analyzed and interpreted sources do not only show the historian as a scholar, but also as a creative artist knowing his craft.

Things go quite differently in computer science. The way computer scientists work however, fits collaboratiuon in a digital humanities context much better. Computer scientists work and publish in teams. It is not rare that a paper knows seven, ten or even twelve authors. In practice this does not mean that all authors have actually written the paper or even read it. Usually only one, two or three people write a paper and the rest has contributed in discussions, has given suggestions or otherwise made a small contribution. As human nature predicts, conflicts arise here as well about being included in an author list or not. Writing has to be as structured as possible within established conventions. There is hardly any room for creative writing, especially not for the younger scientists who still have to prove themselves.

Then there also is the difference in the kind of publications sprining forth from humanities and computer science. Humanities scholars publish in a wide range of journals, in the Netherlands usually rated A, B or C.
These days only the A rated journals really count for the academic output, which involves double blinded peer review[2]. This peer review process takes several months when one is lucky, but with a bit of bad luck it takes six or twelve months before a decision is made on acceptance or rejection.

Computer science also knows a status difference in its publications, but journals are not the most common outlet for output (anymore). Usually publications are directly linked to the conferences where research is presented. You have demos, poster presentations proceedings of workshops et cetera. Contrary to the humanities publications of a lower status, almost all  of these contributions are judged in a peer review process. This peer review knows strict time limits, connected to the dates of the conference for which the work was submitted. It also is much more common to publish work-in-progress, which makes the pace of publication faster, but also makes work outdated (by one's own work) quicker. The results of a conference usually are published online. Scientists also know journals ( with journal papers) with a similar peer review process as the humanities. Usually journal papers are considered most valuable.

Because in the past collaboration in a digital humanities context has not always been succesful, there even are publications on that topic, like the article of  Lynne Siemens in Literary and Linguistic Computing 24 [nr. 2 (2009) 225-233] with the telling title:‘It’s a team if you use “reply all”’: An exploration of research teams in digital humanities environments’. [3] On the basis of a survey filled in by a quite meagre number of  (12) people in digital humanities projects, she points among other things to the following elements which are important for the success of a project: a 'round' representation of all disciplines, a forced reflection on collaboration during the recruitment process, training in team work and techincal skills to be able to understand each other's work, and plenty of real life communication.

The question rermains how in practice such a collaboration can be shaped in the most fruitful manner. When I applied for the BiographyNet project, a substantial part of the procedure was dedicated to how I saw my role in the project and especially how I envisioned the collaboration between me and and the computational linguist and the computer scientist. The project leaders, also with all disciplines represented, have done exactly what Lynne Siemens would have advised in that respect.

Another strong decision to aid collaboration was the placing of the three researchers in the same room. In many other projects everyone does his or her 'own thing' and then meets every once in a while. By doing so however, the creative potential in the work process is not fully tapped into. While for the individual researcher the best ideas usually come to him or her on the bicycle or under the shower, the best exchange of ideas in a team usually also comes on unplanned moments: during coffee breaks, when someone spontaneously sprouts an idea or when the clarification of a point of view by one team member leads to unexpected inspiration for an other team member.

A third wise decision made by the project leaders was to hire all team members more or less full time. Collaboration does not go well when the historian can appeal to the computer scientist once every week with a request to solve a software problem, or if the computer scientist builds beautiful things but only can get input every now and then.from the historian to know if it also makes senses to humanities scholars. Only with an equal input there also can be an equal commitment to the same goals and output. Mixed and round teams in every aspect of the mission therefore.

Finally, a (lay) interest in each other's specialties is imporant for collaboration. It is as the Jem'Hadar from the introduction said, it is necessary '[to] learn to understand your behaviour'. In practice this does not mean that the historian has to become a computer expert, or that the computer scientis needs to be able to learn sixteenth century hand writings, but it does mean that they have to know what the other discipline is about and what kind of practical and methodological issues team colleagues have to face. Some further education, with courses or by learning from each other, can be necessary to achieve that goal.

In practice such a collaboration will not always be possible. Many digital humanties projects are collaborations between multiple institutions, sometimes even across borders, which makes it logistically impossible to have everyone in the same room all the time. The necessary reflection on how fruitful collaboration can be facilitated most easily under the given circumstances however, is something project leaders should occupy themselves with from the very start of writing a research grant proposal, in order to increase the chances of a succesful digital humanities project.


[1] I. Thomson, ‘My race not to be the second Primo’, in: M. Bostridge ed., Lives for sale. Biographers’ tales (Londen/New York 2004) 134-138.

[2] This does not necessarily mean however, that A journals are more strict in their acceptance policy or that they give better feedback to submitted papers

[3] See also the similar reflections of Patrik Svensson, 'Envisioning the Digital Humanities',  Digital Humanities Quarterly 6 (2012) vol.1, part III.

vrijdag 21 februari 2014

Mixed Teams in Every Aspect of the Mission: Samenwerking in Digital Humanities

Het wil nog wel eens gebeuren, gelukkig niet al te vaak, dat ik in werksituaties moet denken aan parallellen in films en t.v. series. Toen ik voor een presentatie bij een gezamenlijke middag van verschillende onderzoeksinstituten iets moest te zeggen over interdisciplinaire samenwerking in een Digital Humanities context, gingen mijn gedachten sterk uit naar een aflevering van Star Trek: Deep Space 9. In deze aflevering, met de veelzeggende titel 'To the Death' wordt de crew van Sterreschip Defiant gedwongen om samen te werken met de Jem'Hadar tegen een gemeenschappelijke vijand. Deze samenwerking verliep nogal stroef door, laten we zeggen, een verschillende mentaliteit. De Jem'Hadar eten niet, slapen niet en gaan de strijd in om hun leven weer terug te krijgen in plaats van om te overleven. Begrijpelijkerwijs was er aanvankelijk weinig respect over en weer tijdens de missietrainingen. Op het moment dat captain Sisko geïrriteerd tegen de Jem'Hadar leider zegt dat het niet helpt dat diens mannen continu minachting tonen voor de crew van Defiant spreekt de Jem'Hadar wijze woorden:


“The only way my troops can come to respect your crew is to fight alongside them. Mixed teams in every aspect of the mission.”

Toen dit idee van gemengde teams in de praktijk werd gebracht bleek dat de Jem'Hadar nog meer wijsheid in petto hadden toen science officer Jadzia Dax een van hen aansprak op zijn gedrag:

“Am I really that interesting? You've been standing there staring at me for the last two hours.” 

De Jem'Hadar antwoordde met: “You are part of my combat team. I must learn to understand your behaviour"

Hiermee zijn meteen de belangrijkste elementen aan de orde gekomen die belangrijk zijn bij een samenwerking in de Digital Humanities, met verschillende disciplines vertegenwoordigd:
 
1. Onwaarschijnlijke samenwerking komt er vanzelf als er maar een gemeenschappelijk doel is.
2. Er is wederzijds respect en begrip nodig om succesvol samen te werken.
3. Samenwerken betekent met elkaar werken, niet naast elkaar werken. 
4.  Ja, het is interessant wat iemand uit je team doet en het is de moeite waard dat te bestuderen (hoewel het wellicht iets minder op andermans zenuwen werkt als je dat niet doet door twee uur naar iemand te staren).
5. Het is van belang om elkaar te begrijpen, elkaars taal en gebruiken te leren. Hoewel geesteswetenschappers en computer wetenschappers biologisch gezien nauwer aan elkaar verwant zijn dan de crew van de Defiant en de Jem'Hadar, kan het bij aanvang nog steeds lijken alsof ze van een andere planeet komen, andere gebruiken hebben en anders praten.

Deze elementen lijken misschien voor zichzelf te spreken, maar in de praktijk lopen er nogal wat Digital Humanities projecten spaak omdat er niet goed genoeg wordt samengewerkt. Zijn er dan daadwerkelijk zoveel verschillen tussen de wetenschappelijke disciplines, behalve dan de voor de hand liggende zaken als een computer scientist die doorgaans van huis uit weinig benul heeft van historische bronnenkritiek en een historicus wiens hersens op blanco gaan zodra men het heeft over RDF en ontologies? Is de wetenschappelijke aanpak om zo dicht mogelijk tot de 'waarheid' te komen niet iets wat alle academici verbindt? Wellicht wel, maar toch zijn er genoeg verschillen die een samenwerking even wennen maken.

In de eerste plaats is er het gegeven van de zelfgecentreerde alfawetenschapper. Historici en hun letterenbroeders- en zusters publiceren doorgaans alleen of hooguit met twee of drie personen. Ze menen zelfs vaak een bepaald onderwerp te kunnen 'claimen' en het is de nachtmerrie van velen onder hun dat er iemand stiekem bezig is met hetzelfde onderwerp [1]. Mensen die op een of andere manier hebben bijgedragen aan de totstandkoming van een boek of artikel worden genoemd in een voetnoot of een voorwoord. Natuurlijk met het risico dat mensen die niet genoemd worden intens beledigd zijn. Het schrijven is een fundamenteel onderdeel van de publicatie. De synthese op basis van het gepresenteerde, geanalyseerde en geïnterpreteerde materiaal toont de historicus niet alleen als een wetenschapper, maar ook als een creatieve kunstenaar die zijn vak verstaat.  

Heel anders gaat het er aan toe in de computer science, maar deze praktijk sluit veel beter aan bij samenwerking in een digital humanities context. Bij computer science werkt men in teams en publiceert ook als zodanig. Het is niet zeldzaam dat er zeven, tien of twaalf auteurs op een paper staan. In de praktijk betekent dat niet dat alle auteurs ook daadwerkelijk hebben meegeschreven of de paper zelfs maar gelezen hebben. Doorgaans schrijven slechts een, twee of drie mensen het paper, heeft de rest meegedacht, suggesties gegeven of anderszins een kleine bijdrage aan het onderzoek geleverd. Zoals het de menselijke natuur betaamt komen ook hier conflicten voor over het wel of niet opnemen van bepaalde personen in een auteurslijst. Het schrijven moet zo strak mogelijk, to the point en binnen de bestaande conventies. Er is niet of nauwelijks ruimte voor mooi schrijven, zeker niet voor jonge academici die zich nog moeten bewijzen in het veld.

Dan is er ook nog het verschil in de soort publicaties die vanuit Letteren en de Bètawetenschappen de wereld in worden gestuurd. Bij Letteren heb je een scala aan tijdschriften van een A, B of C signatuur. Tegenwoordig tellen voor de academische output eigenlijk vrijwel alleen de A tijdschriften mee, waarin een double blinded peer review plaatsvindt.[2]. De peer review kan een proces zijn van enkele maanden, maar met een beetje pech duurt het een half jaar of zelfs een jaar voordat een artikel wordt geaccepteerd of afgewezen. De B-tijdschriften zijn de nog steeds tamelijk serieuze tijdschriften of gelegenheidsbundels met een vaste, academische redactie, terwijl de C-tijdschriften vooral de gezellige lokale Heemkundige uitgaven betreffen.

Bij computer science is er ook een statusverschil in de publicaties, maar wordt dit niet (meer) uitgevochten in tijdschriften. Veelal worden publicaties direct verbonden aan conferenties waarop onderzoek gepresenteerd wordt. Je hebt demo's, poster presentations,  proceedings van workshops et cetera. In tegenstelling tot letterenpublicaties van een lagere status worden vrijwel al deze bijdragen beoordeeld in een peer review proces. Die peer review is verbonden aan een strik tijdschema, samenhangend met de data van de conferentie waarvoor het werk wordt ingediend. Het is ook veel gebruikelijker om work-in-progress te publiceren, waardoor publicaties sneller het licht zien, maar ook sneller weer achterhaald worden door (eigen) nieuw werk.De resultaten van een conferentie worden vervolgens online gepubliceerd. De bèta's kennen ook wel tijdschriften (journal papers) met een vergelijkbaar proces als bij Letteren. Doorgaans worden journal papers het hoogst aangeslagen.


Omdat samenwerking in digital humanities projecten in het verleden nogal een wisselend succes heeft gehad, bestaat er zelfs de nodige literatuur over samenwerking in een digital humanities context, zoals bijvoorbeeld het artikel van Lynne Siemens in Literary and Linguistic Computing 24 [nr. 2 (2009) 225-233] met als veelzeggende titel:‘It’s a team if you use “reply all”’: An exploration of research teams in digital humanities environments’.[3] Op basis van een tamelijk magere survey onder (12) mensen in digital humanities projecten wijst zij onder meer op de volgende punten die van belang zijn voor het slagen van een project: gezamenlijke doelen,alle disciplines evenredig vertegenwoordigd, gedwongen reflectie op samenwerking bij sollicitatieprocedures, training in teamwerk en technische vaardigheden om elkaar en elkaars werk te leren begrijpen, genoeg real life communicatie over en weer.

De vraag blijft dan vervolgens hoe een dergelijke samenwerking het beste kan worden vorm gegeven.  Toen ik solliciteerde voor BiographyNet was een aanzienlijk deel van de procedure gericht op hoe ik mijn rol in het project zag en vooral hoe ik de samenwerking met de computational linguist en computer scientist voor mij zag. De projectleiders, ook met alle disciplines vertegenwoordigd, hebben in dat opzicht dus precies gedaan wat Lynne Siemens had aangeraden.

Een volgend sterk besluit om de samenwerking te bevorderen was het plaatsen van de drie onderzoekers in dezelfde kamer. In veel andere projecten doet iedereen zijn eigen ding en komt om de zoveel tijd bij elkaar. Hiermee wordt echter het creatieve element in het scheppingsproces tekort gedaan. Net zoals voor de individuele onderzoeker de beste ideeën vaak op de fiets of onder de douche komen, vindt de beste uitwisseling in een team plaats op ongeplande momenten. Dus bij de koffie, als iemand een keer spontaan een ballonetje opgooit of als verheldering van een standpunt van een van de teamgenoten leidt tot onverwachte inspiratie bij een van de andere teamleden.

Een ander wijs besluit van de projectleiders was dat alle teamleden min of meer fulltime met het project bezig zijn. Samenwerking gedeidt niet als de historicus een keer per week een beroep kan doen op de computer scientist om iets te vragen of te laten ontwikkelen, of als de computer scientist prachtige dingen bouwt, maar slechts af en toe de input van de historicus kan krijgen om te weten of hij daar wel iets mee kan. Alleen met een gelijkwaardige input kan er ook sprake van zijn dat iedereen zich verbonden voelt aan dezelfde doelen en output.

Tot slot is interesse voor elkaars vakgebieden, zelfs al is het op een lekenniveau, belangrijk voor de samenwerking. Zoals de Jem'Hadar uit de inleiding zei, is dat nodig '[to] learn to understand your behaviour'. In de praktijk betekent dat niet dat de historicus een kei moet worden in programmeren, of dat de computer scientist zestiende eeuwse handschriften moet kunnen ontcijferen, maar wel dat ze van elkaar weten hoe hun onderzoek er ongeveer uitziet en wat daar allemaal bij komt kijken. Enige bijscholing, met cursussen of door van elkaar te leren, kan daarvoor noodzakelijk zijn.    

In de praktijk zal een dergelijke samenwerking niet altijd mogelijk zijn. Veel digital humanities projecten bestaan uit samenwerkingsverbanden tussen meerdere instellingen of zijn zelfs internationaal, waardoor het logistiek onmogelijk is iedereen in dezelfde kamer te plaatsen. De nodige reflectie over hoe samenwerking het beste tot stand kan komen onder de gegeven omstandigheden is echter iets waar projectleiders zich vanaf het begin van het schrijven van een aanvraag mee bezig zouden moeten houden om de kans op een succesvol digital humanities project te vergroten.




[1] I. Thomson, ‘My race not to be the second Primo’, in: M. Bostridge ed., Lives for sale. Biographers’ tales (Londen/New York 2004) 134-138.

[2] Dat betekent overigens niet dat ze noodzakelijkerwijs strenger zijn met de beoordeling, of grondiger met de suggesties ter verbetering

[3] Zie ook de vergelijkbare reflecties van Patrik Svensson, 'Envisioning the Digital Humanities',  Digital Humanities Quarterly 6 (2012) vol.1, part III.